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The Powerful Effects Of Green Tea

By Kevin DiDonato MS, CSCS, CES


Metabolic Syndrome, which is a combination of many health risk factors, is becoming increasingly common in the US and around the world.

It is highlighted by high blood pressure, high blood sugar levels, and high cholesterol.

Researchers are trying to determine the exact cause for the development of Metabolic Syndrome, but so far have come up with very little.

However, they do agree that obesity could be one of the biggest factors in determining your risk for Metabolic Syndrome.

It has been shown that exercise, eating a healthy diet, and including plenty of fatty fish, could be one way to reverse its effects.

However, a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition, Health, and Aging, could show a new approach to treating some of the effects commonly seen in with Metabolic Syndrome.

Let me explain…

Green Tea and Metabolic Syndrome

Green tea, which has been the staple beverage in Asian cultures for centuries, has been shown to have protective effects on your health.

In fact, green tea is full of powerful antioxidants and anthocyanins, which have been shown beneficial to heart and overall health.

However, one potent nutrient, ECGC, has been shown effective as a way to boost weight loss, which could be why it is be the second most consumed beverage in the world (next to water).

The authors of this study evaluated the effects of green tea consumption on different components of Metabolic Syndrome in elderly populations.

They performed an intervention study on 45 elderly participants who were part of the Geriatric Service of Hospital Sao Lucas of Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul.

They  separated the participants into two groups: a control group, who were instructed not to change anything aspects of their diet and a green tea group which was instructed to have one gram of green tea, three times daily for 60 days.

Their results showed that there was statistically significant weight loss in only the green tea group.

Also, the researchers showed that there was a decrease in body mass index (BMI) and a decrease in waist circumference as well in the green tea group as well.

From their data, they concluded that green tea consumption could affect weight loss, BMI, and waist circumference in elderly people who suffer from Metabolic Syndrome.

Although this study shows promise, more research is needed to replicate their findings.  However, this study does corroborate previous findings regarding the effects of green tea on weight loss.

Green Tea and Your Health

Green tea has been used for centuries in Asian populations as a way to improve many areas of health.

Although the benefits have been widely reported, green tea consumption is now just increasing in popularity in the US and other countries.

The number of cases of Metabolic Syndrome is increasing, but there are many ways to combat its effects.

Exercise and the right diet have been shown to reduce blood sugar, cholesterol, and weight, which could reduce the effects of Metabolic Syndrome.

However, according to the results of this study, green tea consumption could also improve weight, BMI, and waist circumference in elderly people that have Metabolic Syndrome.

Adopting a healthier lifestyle by exercising, eating better, including green tea, and using the right medications (if needed) could help control the symptoms associated with Metabolic Syndrome.



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References:

Senger AE, Schwanke CH, Gome I, Gabriela M, Gottlieb V.  Effect of green tea (Camellia sinensis) consumption on the component of metabolic syndrome in elderly.  The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging.  2012.  doi: 10.1007/s12603-012-0081-5.